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followed very carefully the election here in the united states, getting to be interesting. last week it became more interesting, what we do follow you. we do love the american people and the american values. sometimes too much. for example, in the day of independence in israel, a big celebration in may. you'll find people putting up the is reflected in the american flag i don't like. i put on my car only the israeli flag. but by people do? because they do it, the value of the democracy agenda can people. but my main point in the book, israel is not america. even though we love america, we are not america. we cannot make mistakes because if you make a mistake, you pay a price. which are able to correct it. if israel makes a mistake, we cannot correct it. we saw it in the past. my main point in my book that it shall make decisions according to the interest of israel, period, we do not have to think or to try to satisfy anyone, even if it means telling our allies or to the american president or the e.u. or to the u.n., we do not agree with you. and i will give you two examples. we are a
it and the excellent book that he wrote. are respect the president. of course, i will vote for him in the election again. if i did not, of my mom, the lifelong democrat i remember her weeping the day franklin roosevelt died. she just passed away at the age of hundred and 20 couple years ago completing hillary clinton was not liberal enough. [laughter] and five voted republican my mom would come back from the grave and scold me like pineapple. i'm disappointed the president has not taken stronger steps to rid us of the media of testing. ever since no trial left behind was enacted into law is a national psychosis. not just bad pedagogy but something psychotic. my father was a psychiatrist and used to take me to the back toward the of the mental hospital in massachusetts. some of the people in the most severe depression, the only way to ease discomfort was it to number everything. restlessly a moving objects around to get them in the right pattern dead number them. i don't know. i think some of the bureaucrats who gave us this law maybe they would enjoy this day in a recovery house to get over the nu
the president and i will of course vote for him in the election with a lifelong democrat i still remember her weeping denied roosevelt died. my mother just passed away from planning that hillary wasn't liberal enough. if i had voted for republican coming back from the grave and scold me like pineapple was. but i am disappointed that the president hasn't taken stronger steps to rid us of this mania of testing which ever since no child left behind has come into law is the kind of national psychosis, but there's something psychotic about it. it can't be numbered. it doesn't count. my father's psychiatrist use to take me to the back boards of mental hospitals in massachusetts and so many people on the most severe depression the only way they could ease their discomfort is by numbering everything. they would restlessly move object surrounded the table to get them in the pattern, and as i mentioned, some of the bureaucrats in washington maybe they would enjoy este in the recovery house to get over this numerical what action. this hoping of judging children and their teachers primarily on the basis
excited.' i was up there one time when they were having a national election that was practically a revolution. they threw out the party that was in power. they co--completely took off a party that had been there forever, practically disappeared. a whole new set of folks came in, and all the commentators were there on election night saying, 'now let's not get excited.' when they win the world series, instead of cutting up and going wild and people downtown honking and dancing the way they would in america, instead the canadians always go, 'this is quite wonderful, but let's not get excited.' c-span: later in that column you said, 'we're the country that put elvis on a stamp'--you--by the way, did you... >> guest: very proud of... c-span: ...did like elvis presley? >> guest: well, of course. c-span: 'we buy pink lemonade and striped toothpaste.' now i didn't think one of our favorite people would get it into this book, but here he is: '67. 2 percent of us believe that alexis de tocqueville never should have divorced blake carrington.' >> guest: what a great nation. what a great nat
it is not a huge issue in general but a nuclear arms state during the election year. that we keep pushing under the rug there will be a day when north korea is free. it will come within those will realize there could have been more that we could have done in the is where were some anticipated we have overwhelming evidence that anybody could access. there was nothing during the holocaust many people set would have acted differently but today everybody watching this you can find concentration camps. joseph showed me the route he took every day. the fact that he can do that means we have overwhelming evidence of what is happening. but when you look bacteria has accomplished it can do extraordinary things going for the most impoverished country to the tenth largest in 60 years. with a korean-americans have accomplished. it never got that freedom the first half of the 20th century is old news but for north korea they are still stock. and we have a special responsibility when joseph first came in return can to workers restore. you don't think about this. just to buy him a snack. i don't know if he re
at the huntington library macomb center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and science. blake has continued doing numerous boards of museums and historical societies and is a member of the advisory board for the curators of the 9/11 memorial museum. as i mentioned before, he has taught me so very much and served as one of my most frequent sources for my documentary looking for lincoln had my book lincoln on race and slavery at her new film project, the african-american, many rivers to cross. it is my great honor and privilege to present this evening the anisfield-wolf book for nonfiction to my friend and my teacher, david blight. ♪ >> my goodness. i actually juswanted to sit there and let you keep going. i do want to talk about the book. let's listen to skip. if i may borrow a word from isabella, i suppose, what a beautiful word to start almost every line. suppose there was a place to celebrate her books. suppose there was a book award in cleveland pitcher hundreds of people to come celebrate books. suppose there was a place you could just love and
be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power even under this new tenuis regime than the government in libya. the government in egypt has an army and police forces but the problem is political. can an islamic government take action against islamic them craters demonstrators. >> to take the other issue you are talking about this week, iran is a big theme in your book. you talk in one chapter about the iranian pet. the prime minister of israel sees iran very much in terms of the munich analogy. iran heading for having nuclear weapons capability that could threaten the existence of israel so the policy conclusions from that, you have a broader geographical and historica
and there was no pressure on that one. we are moving into another election about change. the central question is whether government is capable of contributing to positive change. the stimulus is exhibit a for the republican argument which is weird because it really ought to be exhibit a for the argument that it can. i realize i sound like an obama cheerleader. it is an extremely uncomfortable role for me and there's a theme for the end of the book where i am talking to joe biden who oversaw the stimulus. he let me sit in on a cabinet meeting devoted to the stimulus and basically giving me a hard time. i read all your articles. you are the only guy who wrote anything remotely positive. i am usually more of a downer than little mary sunshine. my friends will back me up on that. it is unusual for me. he started laughing at me. took him to bed and slept on them -- i didn't get into journalism to tell stories that joe biden would want to cuddle with. i followed the facts and my stories look blowing compared to the ridiculous thoughts ofs without the gotcha that passed for stimulus journalism. as i said about
contacts. this is a fun time, so the other up until election day. >> host: we look forward to learning more about it when the campaign is over. thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which authors are interviewed by journalists, public policy makers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on sunday at 12:00 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click done "after words" and the topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> the next three hours is your turn to tap with author and lecturer's even johnson, the best-selling science writer will talk about the cyberworld, popular culture and computer networking as a political tool. mr. johnson is the author of eight nonfiction books including every name, were good ideas come from an the 2012 release, future perfect. >> host: steven johnson come in your newest book, in a network age, use those term pre-progressive. what is that? >> gu
to the election of president obama and the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2008, to the question of transparency and the kind of good government i think we all envisioned. from my perspective, from about 2010, that energy at kind of dissipated. a lot of efforts have gone toward a lot of things, and we weren't seeing that sort of dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize. we can imagine knowing what the power of data is but it wasn't happening very much. and that caused me to do some work that i will describe your that results in some grades that i will talk about. grading is a cruel art but it sometimes is necessary art how we communicate things. what he did is i looked at the problem of sort of lacking transparency efforts around 2010, and it looked to me like maybe the transparency community have not communicated well enough to the government side. what it was we wanted. a lot of efforts have gone up if it didn't have a direction, didn't have a destination. and so i sat down with some technical people, i'm a lawyer so i have to go back and learn about how these com
person. someone who never sought elected officings and so he didn't do a whole lot to promote himself, although he lived a long life into the late 1800s, 1894 he died, but he retreated in the last 20 years of life into pretty much a private world and didn't promote himself. i also think that soon after the war was over, very soon after the war was over, much of the nation was guided by or inspired by a desire for reconciliation among whites, too bad for anybody else, and holt did not represent that point of view. he was very distressed at the repeated way the nation was unifieded and the former slaves' welfare was banded, and so he was a contrarian, and, again, didn't have a place in that narrative that was being created after the war, or a place for being celebrated in the way that the narrative was being developed after the war so he retreated, and he -- he was bitter, actually, at the end, but he sort of retreated to his private world, and he tried to reconstruct some relationships with family members, descendants of his own generation, nephew and niece in particular, and he clung
airplane you're more likely to be elected president of the united states than you are to die in a commercial airplane crash. the example i give kind of the set piece in the book is story of the miracle on the hudson. reminding my way to the, so they have right context. when the us air flight landed in the hudson and everyone survived i thought it was very telling how the media chose to cover this event. there are really two different ways they covered it. first was superhero pilot, captain sully who indeed was an amazing pilot and amazing job. there was this kind of language of the miracle on the hudson. almost like supernatural event that happened. when people didn't focus on nearly enough was the plane, the plane had, performed admirably during this, during this event and, it did so on a couple of levels. one when the geese collided with the jet engines they didn't explode, they didn't shatter, they didn't send of shard. is of titanium in the fuselage causing the plain to break down. that is because every single jet engine, every single model of a jet engine on aircraft is
Search Results 53 to 65 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)